Holiday Treatment

If your loved one is in treatment this season, read about some of the ways we found joy and check out some of our archived blog posts. December 2013, my son decided to go to treatment. Although he was bummed about “missing the holidays,” it was the best decision he could have made and it turned out to be one of our best-ever Christmases. Perhaps, this will help you have a happier experience as well. MWM

Our drive to treatment took place during a blizzard. My son slept and I white-knuckled the slippery roadways. Although he’d been to other treatment programs, this was the first time he made most of the arrangements. He wasn’t excited about it, but he accepted that it was what he needed to do.

That alone was a present, a holiday miracle. I encourage you to recognize the generosity of your loved one’s decision to go to treatment.

In our initial phone calls and contact with our son, he said things were OK but that he was bored and that time passed very slowly. He complained that the group had to put up Christmas decorations, and that it was a stupid, pointless way to spend time.

Although I could understand his frustration and although I felt he was being unfair with his attitude, I just let it go. Instead, I looked forward to our upcoming visit and seeing the decorations.

Just the other day, I had a meeting at a local treatment program (not the one my son attended), and program participants were in the process of putting up Christmas decorations. They were jovial and seeming to enjoy the experience. It made me think of my son’s experience, and my hunch is that he enjoyed it more than he let on.

That brings me to my next piece of wisdom. Don’t let your loved one make you think it’s so miserable. It just takes time for them to get in the swing of treatment and to find hope (if not immediate happiness) in the positive changes underway. That’s not to say it’s all fun and games; treatment is hard work and emotionally draining. Know in your heart that they are in the right place, doing exactly what they need to be doing. That is a true gift.

During our weekly family visits, I brought commercially prepared treats (homemade wasn’t allowed) and lots of games – board games, cards, dominoes, etc. My son wasn’t ready to be conversational, so playing games was an easier way to connect and share our support. Other residents joined in, too.

My son truly likes our holiday treats – fudge, peanut butter balls, frosted sugar cookies – so I made extra and put these in a decorated tin in the freezer so that he could enjoy these when he completed treatment. He very much appreciated that!

Christmas Eve and Christmas Day fell outside of normal family visiting days, so the treatment center designated a special time. It was on Christmas Day from  1 to 3 p.m., if I remember. I had hoped to bring a deep-dish pizza, but our son’s favorite place was closed on Christmas Day. Instead, I brought a variety of snack items (chips, pretzels, crackers) and individual containers of ice cream – a treat he was really missing.

Keep in mind that treatment food gets boring and is very basic. Working within the Center’s guidelines, we were able to bring special treats.

Again, on Christmas Day, we brought games and had family rounds of all sorts of favorites including the card game UNO. None of us missed the “usual” gathering at Grandma’s that year because we were so glad to be with our son who was sober and starting recovery. (Now, the next year … and this year … well, we are blessed to return to our favorite traditions at home. )

We will never forget the year my son spent Christmas at treatment!

Midwestern Mama

©2015 Our Young Addicts            All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guest Blog: Drug & Alcohol Treatment for Young Adults

This is the third of a three-part series by @DrewHorowitz, a recovery coach and interventionist who specializes in working with young adults and their families to work through addiction, treatment and recovery. Thank you, Drew, for sharing your professional insights to help families confronting substance use.

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A young adult is a hybrid of an adolescent and an adult. I consider most young adults that I work with to be professional adolescents since they have not yet taken on the responsibilities of an adult and have been in graduate studies in adolescent behavior. The oppositional-defiant behavior coupled with the feeling that they are entitled to free room and board eventually causes parents to feel disrespected, resulting in anger. This cycle creates chaos between the young adult and parents, and the untreated addiction coupled with immaturity continues to dominate all parties involved.

A new study shows that nearly 7 million American’s aged 18-25 (more than one in five young adults) needed treatment for drug or alcohol use in the last year. The study, conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) also shows that 95 percent of these young adults did not receive the help they needed at a treatment facility. These levels have remained fairly stable since 2002. In addition, 96 percent of the young adults needing help did not believe they needed the help. Even among the 4 percent who thought they needed treatment in the last year but did not receive it, less than on third made any attempt to get treatment.

Why is it so hard?

Deemed the most challenging age group to treat, the young adult population has flooded drug and alcohol treatment centers throughout the country. Many treatment centers have developed specific tracks, while others have devoted their entire program to this population.

Why? Because young adults do not easily fit into an adolescent group or an adult addiction group. Usually the young adult is the only 24-year old in a group of adults with the average age of 38. The young adult will quickly use this fact as a reason why an addiction program is not what they really need. This patient cannot relate to the adult stressors of childcare, marriage nor the pressure and responsibility of paying bills (which he has never experienced).

Further, this same population cannot identify with the adolescent group either. Adolescents face different stressors and challenges with sobriety when compared to the young adult. Part of this confusion stems from the young adult believing that they are grown men, mature and no longer need “babysitting,” which sometimes occurs in adolescent treatment programming.

For this reason, the combination of young adults with adolescents can be extremely counterproductive, causing patients to leave against medical advice or “checking out” for most of treatment.

How to Treat Young Adults with Addiction

Recognizing the unique needs of this population is imperative for successful recovery. Any addiction treatment program that treats this age group must have the experience, the ability and the interest to deal with this population.

The onset of chemical dependency in the adolescent or young adult stage of human development can result in arrested development preventing the sufferer from maturing into healthy adulthood. For this reason, many young adults arrive at treatment with many childish like tendencies.

For example, the young adult may become argumentative with his or her counselor, push the rules of the program and potentially get them removed from the program for breaking rules. It is common for addiction counselors to create behavioral plans, threaten to involve law enforcement and family, while confronting the young person on their acting out.

This is one of the greatest mistakes that a counselor can make. Confrontation generally makes the situation much worse. Young adults are naturally oppositional and respond poorly to demands and threats. Therefore, when counselors become agitated and frustrated with their client, it amplifies the situation.

The young adult is accustomed to being spoken down to and told that they are out of line or misbehaving. By re-enforcing this pattern, it essentially tells the patient that they are “bad” or “misunderstood”, which pushes them further away and leaving them to cope by using substances.

Changing Our Approach to Treatment for Young Adults

The solution lies in taking a more empathetic, compassionate and caring role to validate frustrations and provide support. Taking a client-centered position and changing the cycle will ultimately create greater outcomes.

The key: to not become part of the dangerous downward cycle that this population creates. By engaging in arguments it fuels the addiction and leads to poor outcomes and early discharges from treatment. However, when validated, recognized and heard, the young person is almost left speechless and in awe by the counselors attitude. It is this understanding and rapport that sets the young adult up for success.

In my experience, this population suffers tremendously from low self-esteem and self-worth. At the basis of their illness rests strong feelings of inadequacy and failure. It is these emotions that fuel the addiction and keeps the young person caught in a cycle of anger and helplessness. For that reason, the foundation of treatment must be built on trust, empathy, support and unconditional positive regard. Additionally, it is crucial that they play a strong role in their recovery. Asking them to assist in writing their treatment plans, allowing involvement in aftercare planning and validating frustrations and concerns goes a very long way with this group.

I recently asked one of my clients, “How can I help you in your recovery?” His response, “Just treat me like a person.” This young man has been through several rigorous treatment programs and all have failed him. The treatment center is not entirely at fault, however many have not set the stage for their recovery.

It is imperative that prior to treating young-adult clients that counselors must first build a strong alliance where the patient and his or her counselor can walk with them through their recovery as opposed to dictating their recovery.

About Drew Horowitz, MA, LADC, RAS, CIP

Drew Horowitz, MA, LADC, RAS, has a vast range of experiences working with addiction and mental health. He gained a wealth of knowledge through his own recovery coupled with extensive training: a master’s level education from the Hazelden Graduate School of Addiction and an undergraduate degree in psychology and human development from Hofstra University. Following a career with several substance abuse and mental health organizations, he formed Drew Horowitz & Associates, LLC, an organization designed to assist young men who struggle to overcome addiction and mental health.

Contact Drew:

http://drewhorowitzassociates.com/

horowitzassociates@gmail.com

651-698-7358

At Wits End with Your Teen’s Substance Use? The T.E.A.M. Approach is a Better Fit ThanTraditional Intervention for Young Adults

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Today’s guest blog post is by Drew Horowitz, MA, LADC, RAS, CIP, a Twin Cities-based substance use and mental health professional. Welcome to the #OYACommunity, and thank you for sharing part 2 of a 3-part series with our readers.

Recently I had a conversation with a mom from North Dakota, and truthfully, it’s a typical conversation I have with parents all over the country.

The mom asked, “Would you be able to come pick up my 22-year-old son and bring him to treatment in Minnesota?”

“Sure.” I replied. “I would be happy to help your son get the treatment he needs. What day are you thinking?”

Her reply: “Well that’s the thing, he doesn’t exactly want to go nor does he think he has a problem”

“Oooookay,” I said with an extended tone. “Well how exactly do you want this to happen?”

The parent went on to explain her utter exhaustion with her son’s addiction and reported that she and her husband were simply “done.” She wanted her son out ASAP and in a treatment center by the end of the week.

I asked the mother, “Have you tried to encourage your son to seek treatment, and if so what did he say?”

Her words: “I have told him over and over again that he has a serious drug problem and he is not the son we raised”.

Enough said, I understood.

The Traditional Approach to Intervention Doesn’t Work Well with Teens

In previous years, my common response entailed an immediate plan of action to quickly intervene and remove the young adult from the environment. The plan would have been simple, either he would come with me to Minnesota or exit the home and live independently (potentially with police involvement). Additionally, I would have placed the element of fear inside his head, by letting him believe that he either came with me or he positioned himself near death.

Using this traditional approach, I have conducted countless interventions nationwide. Repeatedly, I showed up at homes around the country and informed young adults that they had two choices: A. Go into treatment TODAY or B. live independently on the streets without the support of family or friends.

Addicted or not, almost 80% made the choice to reluctantly enter treatment. Leveraged into a corner, the young adult considers living independently on the streets, however, generally sees that treatment may be a better option.

That being said, it’s almost never a fairy-tale ending.

An extremely high percent of those admissions did not stay sober or even remain in treatment.

Families would call me a few weeks later and ask for help – in complete despair with the rebellious nature of their son or daughter.

A Realization in the Making

Continually, I was saddened by what I was seeing and it personally effected me. I realized that I was not actually providing a beneficial service to families as THEY, the families, were essentially dictating the course of action.

I posed the question to myself, “Shouldn’t it be I, the professional, to provide the family with the best option to support their son or daughter?” I pondered on that thought and knew that there must be a better way to do this!

Launching a New, Improved Approach to Helping Young Adults with Addiction

In August 2014, when I founded Drew Horowitz & Associates, I decided that my method of intervention would change. My objective would be to incorporate a strength-based, empowering approach to intervention.

The new approach is called the “Teen Environmental Advancement Model” (T.E.A.M) and it’s designed to help teenagers and young adults seek treatment for their existing substance use disorder.

It does not use leverage or force to move them into a recovery setting. Instead, this model works to educate people on themselves, identify values and aspirations, draw discrepancy between existing behavior and goals and learn about steps that best position them to be successful in life.

In my professional opinion, it made much more sense to “meet the client where they are at” and guide them through a process to begin understanding the detriment of their behavior. Not only does this model help the individual make their own decision to enter treatment, but also it increases the odds of long-term sobriety.

T.E.A.M. Work (Teen Environmental Advancement Model) 

Let me share the approach with you in with the counselor applies empathy, genuineness, self-disclosure and compassion and in which we continually work to strengthen rapport and alliance with the young person.

  • Preparation: This consists of the counselor gathering information from family and friends regarding the condition of the identified young person. This process helps the counselor come to understand the person of concern.
  • Introducing the idea: The counselor provides a suggested script for families to use when they introduce their loved one with the idea of meeting a counselor. The counselor then coaches parents and other family members on how to answer the person’s questions and address their objections, thereafter helping families overcome those barriers and create a segue for the counselor to meet with the person.
  • Meeting the Young Person: Next, we schedule a first meeting between the person of concern and the counselor. The counselor begins building rapport and establishing trust, taking an empathetic and person-centered approach that differentiates between the people being “sick” versus “bad.”
  • Building Discrepancy: At this point, the counselor meets with the person of concern to help identify goals, aspirations and personal values, continuing throughout to build rapport and validate the person’s thoughts, feelings and frustrations. While encouraging the person to attain their vision, the counselor begins the process of building discrepancy between the ways the person is living versus their values. The counselor methodically works to help the person see that their current behavior isn’t allowing them to be the person they want to be. In most cases, the person of concern starts to become self-aware of their destructive behaviors and agrees with some need for change.
  • Making a Recommendation: Now the counselor recommends a course of action. This involves remaining non-confrontational and compassionate while informing the person that the next step in moving forward and accomplishing their goals entails entering a treatment program of some type. Opposition and frustration are typical responses, to which the counselor reminds the person that by seeking treatment they best position themselves to be successful in life and attain goals. However, the person is never forced into treatment, but instead is encouraged to keep an open mind about the process. It is not uncommon for the person to start at a lower level of care and work up to an in-patient setting.
  • Entering Treatment: The counselor arranges transport to the treatment facility and, in the interim, prepares the person for their treatment experience, investing considerable time in articulating to the person how much courage and strength they’re demonstrating by taking this life-changing step.
  • Moving Forward: At this point, the person of concern is under the care of the treatment provider and it’s critical that they remain on track. Toward that end, the counselor’s role changes to that of a clinical case manager for the person and a family educator for their loved ones. Ideally, the counselor visits the person in treatment weekly or biweekly, depending on the facility’s location.
  • Providing After Care: As primary treatment concludes, the person of concern receives a recommendation for continuing care. The counselor supports the treatment program’s recommendation and encourages the person to follow through, applying intervention tactics and working with the family as needed to ensure that they take the appropriate aftercare steps.
  • Turning it Over: The counselor’s involvement isn’t intended to be long-term. The hope is, after a period of time, the person of concern will no longer be a concern. The counselor defers to the recovery community and encourages the person to lean on their new found community—their sponsor and peers—for ongoing support. That said, the counselor never declines a phone call or meeting request.

Using the T.E.A.M. model, I have seen a massive increase in positive outcomes among young adults: Pleasant goodbyes from home, motivation in treatment to get healthy, abiding by aftercare recommendations and active participation in the recovery process.

In order to be effective with today’s vulnerable young adult population, we must promote autonomy, strength and mutuality. I now leave interventions with a sense of inner peace and hopefulness that I had never experienced in the past. More importantly, our young loved ones and their families are finding a similar inner peace and hopefulness, too.

Drew Horowitz, MA, LADC, RAS, has a vast range of experiences working with addiction and mental health. He gained a wealth of knowledge through his own recovery coupled with extensive training: a master’s level education from the Hazelden Graduate School of Addiction and an undergraduate degree in psychology and human development from Hofstra University. Following a career with several substance abuse and mental health organizations, he formed Drew Horowitz & Associates, LLC, an organization designed to assist young men who struggle to overcome addiction and mental health.

Drew Horowitz, MA, LADC, RAS, CIP
Drew Horowitz, MA, LADC, RAS, CIP
Contact Drew:

http://drewhorowitzassociates.com/

horowitzassociates@gmail.com

651-698-7358

©2015 Our Young Addicts         All Rights Reserved

Positive Change is in the Air!

Today is eight months sober for Midwestern Mama’s son! Not only is trust growing, she is trusting herself more and seeing the #PositiveChange that come from trusting that things will turn out as they are meant to be.

Encouragement is one of the best things we can offer each other, especially for those of us who are parenting young addicts – in active use or in recovery. It’s often the most uncharted territory we’ve ever experienced, so that’s why encouragement is important; but I’d say that’s where unvarnished truth is paramount as well. We need to hear the good and the bad because the truth in neither good or bad – it is simply the way it is currently and it gives us an opportunity to see the possibilities ahead.

In each of my interactions with the Our Young Addicts community, I offer been-there-done-that perspective. I’m a naturally upbeat, positive person but don’t confuse this for being naive or oblivious to the challenges that addiction and recovery bring.

When we discover substance use and then begin to experience addiction, we focus on “if they would just go to treatment” or “if they would just stop using.” Sometimes they do. Sometimes that happens right away. Quite often, it takes time – lots of time and consequences – before they are ready. During this process many mantras surface, including the familiar “letting go” where you and a higher power connect.

Then, one day, recovery begins. With that comes a whole new slew of hopes and expectations. Once again, the “letting go” mantra surfaces. This time, letting go is about three-way trust – you, your higher power and your loved one. This third component – your loved one – is so much stronger than you ever imagined.

Trusting my son means trusting myself and also trusting that things will work out as they are meant to. Whoa! What a difference.

As I write about the many positive changes taking place for my son and our family, it’s also had its challenges and concerns. Recovery is not easy for any one of us, but trust me we much prefer this stage.

In particular, my son has a good deal of social anxiety. He pulls it together for school and work, but frankly, it exhausts him and overwhelms him.

Initially, he reconnected with some of his high school friends (now in their early 20s and having moved on with their lives) but has sense withdrawn from them. He has very little social life – and mom, dad and little brother day in and day out are a poor substitute for the fun and interaction that a 22-year-old craves.

Because he doesn’t embrace 12-steps, there are fewer options for support meetings. And, because he doesn’t like groups in general, he doesn’t want to attend alternatives such as Health Realization or SMART Recovery or Sober Meet Ups. It’s frustrating to live in what’s affectionately known as the Recovery Mecca or Land of 10,000 Rehabs (Minnesota!) and that he doesn’t want to be part of this community.

At work, he’s convinced that no one likes him and that his coworkers conspire against him. He’s certain that’s why he doesn’t get the good shifts. Likely it’s not true, but it feels miserable all the same.

All this pessimism worries me. It feels like an anxiety attack or depressive strike in the making. It feels like a relapse could trigger. Sometimes, I realize that it could be even worse – suicide or overdose. Honestly, I don’t sense this is eminent or I would be taking extremely proactive steps. I do, however, know that I have to be aware and that I have to trust myself to intervene or to let go. I pray a lot. And as you know, I write and reach out to others. I am blessed with a wonderful support network and this community. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

With all that aside, let me share with you a recent positive change, however, and I am crediting it all to the growing trust that we’re experiencing!

The other day, my son begrudgingly went to his workplace party – a Monday evening dinner with games and prizes. All on his own, he styled up in a sharp sports coat, button-down shirt and leather dress shoes. (Most days, it’s sweat pants and a hoodie.) Not only did he enjoy the meal, he played cards and even won one of the raffles, and he got to meet and chat with the owner of the company. He stayed the whole evening and was in an upbeat, chatty mood when he got home.

The next day, he worked a lunch shift (since he’s on spring break from school and had extra hours available). He was tipped well and again came home in a positive mood.

That evening, he ran some errands with the family and we went out for burgers at a new restaurant. Often in the past, we’d ask if he wanted to join us and he’d say, “No, don’t feel like it.”

Today, he took the dog out for a walk – something that subzero temps have precluded. The sunshine and mild temperatures spoke to him. I can only believe that some Vitamin D will do him some additional good!

And, he shared with me that one of his friends is turning 24 today and that he had reached out to say happy birthday. I was so proud of him for doing that. Further, the friend lives a couple of hours away and my son asked if it might be possible to borrow the car to go visit him sometime. Absolutely!

It’s funny because a week ago I had said to my husband that I’d probably trust our son to drive to visit his friend and stay the night. We agreed we could trust him, but I was hesitant to suggest it. Instead, he came up with the idea on his own – thus, he likes the idea! This really encourages me. This is a friend who stuck by him through his worst days and who is himself a positive role model.

I’m encouraged and trust this is a turning point.

Midwestern Mama

Let #Gratitude2014 Continue!

Midwestern Mama recaps the past week of #Gratitude2014 posts. 

At this time last year, our son was in desperate shape, and it was getting worse.  At age 21, he was several years into drug addiction, and he was homeless, penniless and jobless.  He was, however, softening to the idea of treating his depression and anxiety, and a wise, young counselor directed him toward in-patient dual-diagnosis treatment as the first course of action. Fortunately, when funding became available and a bed opened up, our son went and this time he stuck it out for the recommended time.  While a terrible relapse occurred a few months after that, he got back to treatment and recovery this summer.  As you can imagine, the transformation and positive possibilities ahead fill us with gratitude.

Here are some of the things I’ve identified this past week as part of Our Young Addicts “30 Days of Gratitude.”

Day 13: I am grateful that my son is starting to open up with us about his feelings and experiences.

Day 14: I am grateful for the opportunity to share my story with you.

Day 15: I am grateful that my son has nutritious food, a warm bed, a clean shower and fresh clothes these days.

Day 16: I am grateful that we recognized our son’s struggle and did everything we could to get him help, even though he resisted.

Day 17: I am grateful that my son’s siblings are a strong support system for him.

Day 18: I am grateful that my son is building a sober network of friends even though social anxiety makes it difficult.

Day 19: I am grateful that we are part of our son’s recovery, now and forever.

Day 20: I am grateful for all the stories that others have shared with me and the encouragement offered.

Please join us in looking for gratitude even in the darkest days.  Keep hoping and praying, and know that there is a community that cares.

Midwestern Mama

Practicing Patience

Parenthood has taught me – or offered many opportunities to learn – patience.  During my three pregnancies, I learned that timing was not up to me.  Each child arrived when they were good and ready … and not necessarily on the designated due date.   When they were infants, I learned that their needs came first and that the notion of feeding and diapering schedules was nothing but a myth put out by Dr. Spock.

Each of them learned different skills at different time – one was an early walker at 9 months, another didn’t walk until 13 months.  One learned to ride a two-wheel bike at age three, another was closer to 8 years old. It didn’t really matter because each learned to do what they needed to when they were ready.  As they learned, so did I.

I am reminded of these lessons in patience as we await next steps for our son’s treatment and recovery.  He officially wrapped up his treatment program last week, but he’s still there because there’s not yet an opening at any of the half-way house programs.  He’s ready to move on.

There’s very little I can do to move things along any quicker than they are.  It’s frustrating that the timeline isn’t what we’d like it to be, what we expected.  It’s a lesson in patience that the right place will come along at the right time.  It’s a lesson in patience to not know which place that will be.  It’s a lesson in patience to not jump in and try to see if there is anything I can do – it’s up to him and his counselor to work through the system, and I must let them.

This is an opportunity to practice patience, again.

Midwestern Mama

Tradition and Transition – Christmas in Rehab

Traditions are the mainstay of holidays.  We all look forward to certain activities, foods, friends and family.  We hold to these and honor the way we’ve always done things but sometimes changes come along.  Like some many things in life, we can view change as challenge or opportunity.

This year, our Christmas celebration will be different and although that brings nostalgia and a certain discomfort with the prospect of changing tradition, it also comes with hope.  One big part of our changed tradition this year will be that our son is in rehab; he will miss being part of our traditional gathering and activity, and he is understandably a bit sad about this.  In sober times and high times, he’s always been a key personality in our holidays.

Instead, his treatment center is holding visiting hours on Christmas Day from 12:30 to 4 p.m.  Ordinarily, this is the time we would be preparing and enjoying a feast at his grandmother’s house.  The choice of where to be and what to do is obvious for us.  We will be heading over the river and through the woods to the treatment center – mom, dad, big sister and little brother.  We’ll be bringing commercially-prepared treats (my homemade cookies, fudge and peanut butter balls are stashed in the freezer for him to enjoy upon his release in the new year).  We’ll be bringing a bag full of toys (games, actually) to enjoy as a family — UNO, Cribbage, Yahtzee and others.  While it will be a different Christmas Day celebration, it will be no less of a celebration, and one we are all looking forward to.

All that positivity aside, I speak the truth when I know how odd it will feel when he’s not at our dining room table on Christmas Eve for our family’s dinner, and it will be awfully quiet on Christmas morning when he’s not there to discover what Santa left in his stocking or open presents.  At the same time, he’s a young adult and would be transitioning to new holiday routines anyway at some point, so sobriety and recovery are an excellent way to make the transition.

Happy holidays, all!

Midwestern Mama

Progress is Progres – an Update on Rehab and Recovery

Tomorrow marks two weeks in at rehab.  We attended a family session with our son’s counselor over the weekend.  Many of our suspicions were confirmed as he came clean on more details of the recent years.  Their approach is Health Realization, which seems a good fit for him.  They’ve got him on Wellbutrin for depression and Naltrexone for his Heroin/opiate use (one of those confirmed suspicions – he’s more than a Pothead as we always figured).  He’ll wrap up there the first week of January and then do 90 days at a MICD halfway house followed by up to six months at a sober-living house.  We are so proud of him for starting this and hopeful he will stick with it; I believe he has a long and difficult recovery ahead for himself.  We knew he was in pain, and he is, but it’s lifting and his spirits are good. 

There will be a visiting day on Christmas Eve.  Although I’m sad that he will not be with us for our family activities at home, I know he’s where he needs to be and that we are all receiving the gift of recovery.

Throughout this journey of addiction, I have continued to seek information and support.  Learning has helped keep things in perspective.  Communing with others has helped us feel less alone.  Some of the things we have learned have been hard and ugly, but knowledge is empowering.  Many of the relationships we have formed have been the difference between our own sanity and serenity.  We are grateful and know we will progress along with our son on the difficult path ahead.

Wishing you all guidance and support on the path along with Our Young Addicts.

Midwestern Mama

 

So far, so good

Yesterday I visited my son at treatment – what a positive experience.  First off, he looked the best I’ve seen him in a very long time.  He was smiling, his eyes sparkled and he even seemed to be standing a bit taller.  A warm bed, sleep, and regular meals all seem to be agreeing with him.  He spoke about the Health Realization model that this center takes for mental health and addiction.  He was hopeful and grateful.

It could be the new-car smell, but for now that’s OK.  It’s the best foundation for the hard work ahead.  As some point this week, my husband and I will meet with our son and his counselor to learn more about the treatment plan.

Midwestern Mama

The Journey Continues – Treatment Day 2

Yesterday morning my son entered a 28-day residential treatment program for dual diagnosis – MICD (mental illness & chemical dependency). He was deemed “highly appropriate ” for the program. We hope he will embrace this gift of time to commit to understanding his challenges, feelings, actions and addiction. We pray he is ready and willing for recovery.

Although he is not happy about going to treatment, he realized he no longer has any other options.  He did not put up nearly as much fight as he has previously.  Perhaps his resign will rally as relief once he begins the hard, but insightful work ahead.

Midwestern Mama