Recovery High Schools in Minnesota

One of our conference attendees provided two helpful documents with information on recovery high schools in Minnesota. Check out this attached list and map. MWM

Map Recovery Schools – MNMinnesotaRecoverySchools2

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What Are Sober High Schools & Are They Working?

With only a handful of sober schools across the nation, the general public has little to no knowledge of sober schools. This week’s author highlights the functions and efficacy of sober schools. -MWM

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The journey from addiction to sobriety isn’t a straight line. In fact, every person’s path will curve in unique ways, representative of the multitude of different recovery resources that can be any person’s catalyst toward lasting sobriety. Of course, many of us associate addiction treatment programs with recovery, particularly when the individual is taking the first steps to sobriety; however, many individuals have achieved success in recovery without stepping foot in a clinical rehabilitation facility. Today, there are more and more alternatives to the traditional clinical model of recovery, and these new alternatives are largely a reflection of how the face of addiction has evolved over the decades.

If you look at recent statistics, you’ll see that one of the demographic groups that at extremely high risk of addiction is adolescents, teens, and young adults. For this reason, there’s been a surge of research and development when it comes to recovery solutions that target youths who are either at risk of addiction or developing substance abuse problems. One such solution is a recovery school, also known as a sober school.

What exactly is a “sober school”?

Over the years, youths have proven to be one of the most concerning demographic groups when it comes to risk for alcohol and drug problems. While it may seem like overbearing parental concern is to blame for making teens a risk group, statistics have actually shown that more and more teens have been abusing alcohol, marijuana, prescription painkillers, and a number of other substances over time. As a result, there’s been a push for more recovery resources that are tailored specifically to youths, which is where sober high schools come into play.

These schools allow for the separation of these at-risk teens from public schools.”

The most straightforward explanation of a sober school is a school that’s intended specifically for adolescents recovering from substance abuse problems or who are perceived as being at high risk of developing alcohol or drug problems. The idea behind recovery schools is the fact that school and peers are often at the heart of teens’ risk for substance abuse problems. Basically, these schools allow for the separation of these at-risk teens from public schools where studies have shown there has been increasing rates of substance abuse; this separation essentially minimizes the recovering students’ risk of relapse. And not only do recovery schools provide separation from mainstream public schools but they also incorporate a focus on sobriety and physical health as a major part of the curriculum. There’s a focus on mental health as well as helping the students to find ways to mitigate stress and anxiety that would otherwise put them at risk of relapsing and developing other substance abuse problems.

Does it work?

According to studies that have analyzed the efficacy of sober schools, they have been extremely effective at safeguarding students’ recoveries and helping students avoid alcohol and drugs. In effect, the goal of the recovery school is to replace risk factors with so-called protective factors. Moreover, these schools want to help students who have experienced substance abuse problems to establish firm footing in recovery since the absence of mind-altering substances, which alter mood and cognition, will result in many students needing to adjust to how they experience their environments and the world around them.

As to the specific parameters of recovery schools, they’ve largely be determined according to the factors that have been identified as leading to recidivism among teens with histories of substance abuse. For instance, the highest risk has been associated with students who don’t participate in productive academic activities, return to environments previously associated with alcohol and drug abuse, fail to maintain or establish contact with students who don’t abuse mind-altering substances, aren’t involved or have strong relationships with family members, and have little interest in attending or joining support groups. In short, the main goals of a recovery school is to mitigate these factors, encouraging involvement in productive pastimes, familial involvement, relationship-building with non-using peers, and so on.

Students are provided with the tools needed to thrive both academically and in recovery.”

One of the main concerns that people have regarding recovery schools hinges on the misunderstanding that the recovery focus comes at a sacrifice of traditional academic subjects, but that’s not the case. Students at recovery schools still take the essential academic classes, including mathematics, history, English, natural and applied sciences, and so on; however, the chief difference is that there’s a strong recovery support system built into the curriculum, ensuring that students are provided with the tools needed to thrive both academically and in recovery.

Considering the results of recent studies, we can conclude that recovery schools are an extremely effective means of reinforcing sobriety among teens with histories of substance abuse. Per the study cited above, the rate at which students enrolling in recovery schools met the diagnostic criteria for addiction was 90 percent; however, after a year of being in a recovery school, that figure dropped to an astounding 7 percent, showing that real results are being achieved with recovery schools. Currently, it’s estimated that there are 33 sober high schools in the United States, but considering the success that students attending these schools have experienced, we will likely be seeing more recovery-oriented high schools opening in the immediate future.

 

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About the Author: 

Luke Pool is a grateful member of the Recovery community. He has found his purpose in life by helping those who suffer from the diseases of addiction. He uses blogging and social media to raise awareness about this epidemic, affecting every part of this country. Now working for Stodzy internet marketing, he is able to pursue his passion by informing as many people as possible about addiction. Originally from Austin, Texas he now lives in South Florida.

 

 

 

 

 

Guest blog posts are welcome additions to the content on this website. Guest blog posts represent the views, opinions and experiences of the author and do not necessarily represent Our Young Addicts. Together, we provide parents and professionals with a variety of perspectives and information.

©2017 Our Young Addicts   All Rights Reserved.

Minnesota Resource Guide for Young People and Their Families, Friends and Loved Ones

It should be easy, but it’s not. So, let’s change that!

For as many helpful resources as there are, it still remains a quagmire to find programs and services for young people who are using drugs and alcohol. Parents, family members and friends want to help but Google searches often lead to 1-800 job numbers that promise local resources … but don’t really offer these. It’s downright frustrating.

Experience. Resources. Hope.

Our annual From Statistics to Solutions conference is all about connections and collaboration, so we are gathering content to develop a Resource Guide. We will start locally with resources in Minnesota, and we hope to expand it nationally over time.

Be part of our Resource Guide – Join More than 100 Minnesota Resources.

If you offer services for young people and their families in Minnesota, please let us know if you would like to be included. Details are included in our recent e-newsletter.

Categories include but are not limited to:

  • Addiction Treatment
  • Assessment Services
  • Community Coalitions
  • Healthy Eating
  • Housing & Emergency Services
  • Intervention Services
  • Local Statistics
  • Mental Health & Wellbeing
  • Law Enforcement
  • Overdose Prevention (naloxone)
  • Prevention Programs
  • Recovery Coaching
  • Recovery Schools – high schools and collegiate
  • Resources for Friends and Family
  • Resources for Parents
  • Reproductive & Sexual Health

©2017 Our Young Addicts            All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

5 Morning Routines to Improve Recovery

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This week’s guest blogger enlightens us with helpful tips on how to set the right tone for the day. Mornings are difficult, but developing a routine can make them easier. MWM. 

For most people, their morning mood sets up the rest of their day. The same applies for people in drug addiction recovery. If you want to have a healthy, happy, clean day, the best thing to do is start it right. When you are in recovery, and are trying out new things to replace the bad habits for good habits, it can be difficult to find things that satisfy you.

Motivating a young person to change and embrace positive things can be challenging, however today I would like to share with you 5 specific things I learned in recovery to make sure that my morning routine was the first thing to do for a successful day.

  1. Morning affirmations

Addicts generally don’t have a very high opinion of themselves. In fact, low self-esteem is a big reason that people turn to spice or other substances so that they can somehow feel better. Add in the teenage/young person factor, the self-esteem problems and the constant struggle between addiction and how to look for their loved ones, and you could even end up with a depressed person.

It can be difficult to feel confident and self-assured when going through recovery, especially during the beginning stages, but good self-esteem is a key contributor to successful recovery”

The problem is that the negative consequences of a life of addiction only worsens the already fragile image that young addicts have of themselves, making the problem bigger than it already was. We tend to look to others for compliments and praises, but the most important person whose approval and encouragement we need is ourselves.

It can be difficult to feel confident and self-assured when going through recovery, especially during the beginning stages, but good self-esteem is a key contributor to successful recovery. 

A great way to start injecting your life with positivity, a bigger sense of self-worth, and value is to look in the mirror and say self-affirmations every morning. You can help a young person by saying these affirmations next to them every day. It may seem silly, or like a waste of time, but when you start to think of yourself in a better light and vocalize your hopes and goals in an assuring way, it will slowly help reshape your whole perspective.

  1. Inner peace

Stress and anxiety are two major factors that contribute towards addiction or, at the very least, temptation. A great way to combat these and many other pressures of life is to meditate. Do not let any stigma you move over the word to rob you of the positive effects it can bring to your life. Meditation comes in many shapes and sizes, just like the individuals that practice it. 

You don’t have to sit in the lotus position with your hands holding strange mudras while attempting to clear your mind and focus on your breathing, this is specially boring and unappealing for young people. Instead, teach them meditation through dancing, singing, relaxing music, painting, even taking a walk in a park.

Taking a moment every day to just slow down and focus on your own peace of mind will make a huge impact on your ability to deal with stressful situations or things that could possibly trigger your addiction”

With meditation, you just have to focus on peaceful, beautiful things that make you feel good inside. Taking a moment every day to just slow down and focus on your own peace of mind will make a huge impact on your ability to deal with stressful situations or things that could possibly trigger your addiction.

  1. Get moving

Living with an addiction has a large variety of unhealthy consequences, but the lack of exercise also affects your mental state, your energy levels, and your self-esteem. Take advantage of that inherent energy young people have, especially when they are going through addiction recovery!

When you do physical activity that increases your heart rate up, strengthens your muscles and gets some energy flowing through your body, chemicals released like serotonin and dopamine that improve the way you feel both physically and emotionally. Getting your day started with this kind of boost will help improve the rest of your day.

  1. Planning 

Set some time aside to set some sort of schedule for the rest of your day. In recovery, it is important to build new routines and healthy habits, as far from the things that led you down the path of addiction in the first place. 

You can do this the moment you wake up or while you’re sitting down for breakfast. Your plan doesn’t have to be too detailed or include specific time slots. It could be as simple as a to-do list. 

A set plan and an idea of what’s to come in your day will also help develop a sense of control and purpose to keep your mind from wandering to unwanted things, it is also a life skill that a young person can develop to apply for the rest of their lives.

  1. Bigger than you 

For many people, the sense that they are not alone is the most powerful tool in recovery. 

You don’t have to call it spirituality or religion. This is just the belief in something outside of you that is bigger, more powerful and has your best interest at heart.  For a lot of people, the ability to place their faith in a higher power and believe that everything will be alright takes the pressure of recovery off.

Something like a prayer or a conversation with whatever higher power you believe in when you wake up and at any other point during the day can make your weight feel much lighter. 

Your morning routine has the ability to set your day on the right path, and infuse an extra boost of positive drive into yourself”

Your morning routine has the ability to set your day on the right path, and infuse an extra boost of positive drive into yourself. With the right routine, your addiction recovery will be much easier. 

About Our Guest Blogger:

I’m Carl Towns, a 28-year-old wanna-be writer; I am also a recovering addict in the path of self-discovery. My goal is to learn as many things as possible and to seize every single moment I live, pretty much trying to make up for all that I missed on the years I was lost in drugs and alcohol (among other things). I’m in love with tech, cars and pretty much anything that can be found online.

Guest blog posts are welcome additions to the content on this website. Guest blog posts represent the views, opinions and experiences of the author and do not necessarily represent Our Young Addicts. Together, we provide parents and professionals with a variety of perspectives and information.

©2017 Our Young Addicts      All Rights Reserved

Hiding Drugs: Teenagers Are Smarter Than We Think

Creativity flows out of all children, but as this week’s guest blogger points out, this can mean creative hiding spots for illicit substances. Here are some new places to look, and ways to identify hiding spots. MWM

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The teenage years are when habits start forming, and in the future, this could even include drug abuse. In fact, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 40 percent of 12th graders have used drugs at least once in the past year. These are people that are just 17 or 18, who still have their lives ahead of them. They could be using all kinds of drugs like marijuana or even something more obscure like Suboxone. Addiction is also a possibility.

These teenagers often have a secret hiding place for their drugs. Without the help of parents, these teens might be hiding drugs somewhere. They could be hiding drugs around the house or even in their cars. It’s up to you to discover it and stop their drug abuse before it’s too late.

In bedrooms

This is one of the most obvious places a kid would hide drugs. It’s their personal space and it’s not expected that parents would search it. It’s their own safe space. The most obvious place to look for drugs would be a dresser. Or maybe a sock drawer. Still, there are so many other places a kid could hide drugs.

Diversion safes are actually very common. These safes are disguised as something else, for example, cleaning supplies. We all know kids don’t ACTUALLY clean (I kid). Here is a site with a bunch of crafty products. If you fear your kid might be using a diversion safe to hid drugs, look for something that is always in their room and seems somewhat suspicious. Many of these don’t have locks either, so they’re easy to access.

Kids might try to tape drugs to a ceiling fan, open up a light switch and hide it inside, or they could tape it under their bed. It’s overwhelming, but they might also hide drugs in other areas, such as:

  • Shoe boxes
  • Old shoes
  • Clothes in their closet
  • Inside pillows
  • Hollowed out books
  • Makeup
  • Inside appliances that have a battery socket or other hollow openings
  • Old boxes for already opened products.

Around the house

Some teens will think a step ahead of their parents and hide drugs around the house where a parent is less likely to look. If you take off the back of the toilet and look under the lid, teens might hide drugs in there. There are many crevices around the house that never get checked. Here are a few more places that a kid might hide their drugs:

  • In someone else’s room (a younger sibling)
  • Inside kitchen supplies
  • Drop ceilings
  • Highlighters or pens
  • Appliances throughout the house (old VCR players)

In their car

Some kids think their car is their own personal space, so they can hide drugs in it. Unfortunately, this can lead to legal problems. If you think your kid is abusing drugs, you have every right to look in their car. If not, the school possibly could consider the presence of drugs in a car as on school-property. If a cop finds it before you do, there could be very large fines. Here are a few places teens might try to conceal drugs:

  • Under a seat
  • Inside an air vent
  • Glove box
  • Trunk
  • A compartment that can be removed

Teenagers that get involved in substance abuse can be quite crafty with how they hide their drugs. It isn’t always easy to find these concealed drugs, but it’s important to find and talk to a teenager before something truly bad happens.

About this week’s guest blogger: Josh Drzewicki

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Josh is a variety writer hailing from Detroit. In his free time, he enjoys long walks through the city while listening to NPR podcasts. Josh has relatives and friends who suffered from addiction as early as high school, and writes about substance abuse to help others overcome their struggles with addiction.

Connect with Josh at:

Twitter @joshdrzewicki

Guest blog posts are welcome additions to the content on this website. Guest blog posts represent the views, opinions and experiences of the author and do not necessarily represent Our Young Addicts. Together, we provide parents and professionals with a variety of perspectives and information.

©2017 Our Young Addicts   All Rights Reserved.

The Sudden and Real Dangers of Opiate Addiction

Being an advocate for the addicted involves understanding the costs of addiction. Today’s guest blogger provides an insight into the reality of America’s substance abuse. MWM

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Millions of people across the world, over 300,000 in the U.S. alone, are addicted to the class of drugs derived from the poppy flower made famous in the Wizard of Oz. In 2015, over 33,000 Americans lost their lives due to opiates such as heroin, Vicodin and fentanyl. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control) has declared an Opiate Epidemic and has organized efforts with other government agencies to intercept the growing supply of illicit street opiates and to curb the dangerous over-prescribing of opiate-based pain pills.

Young People are Vulnerable to Opiate Addiction

One of the greatest dangers associated with opioid drug addiction is the body’s ability to quickly develop a tolerance to the drug and in turn the body’s increased dependence on the drug to function. People who take prescribed opiate-based pain medications like Vicodin and people who use illegal street drugs like heroin have the greatest risk of addiction.

For those taking doctor-ordered pain medication, length of time using the drug, accessibility, low-income and previous alcohol and drug use are high-risk factors. Benzodiazepines, like Valium and Xanax, depress the central nervous system and are often associated with death from opioid overdose.

Astonishingly, young adults aged 18 to 25 are becoming the fastest growing group of addicts”

Illicit opiate addiction is often preceded by other addictions and affects people from all walks of life and ages. Astonishingly, young adults aged 18 to 25 are becoming the fastest growing group of addicts. In the early 2000s young adult addiction rates hovered around five percent. By 2015, though, that number jumped over ten percent.

Perhaps the most frightening part of all is the prescription opioid abuse can lead to heroin addiction. The majority of heroin addicts aged 12 to 21 years old report having first used prescription pills. Without awareness and a certain vigilance in treating our youth for opiate addiction, the addiction can progress into more dangerous drugs.

The Cost of Addiction

In the United States, opiate abuse and addiction are responsible for over $78 billion in healthcare cost, legal costs and lost productivity. More importantly, the high cost of addiction includes tens of thousands of lost lives through overdose, financial ruin and loss of quality of life. Individuals, families and whole communities are negatively affected. The danger of addiction touches the ones closest to those struggling with addiction.

In November, 2016, Niki Hamilton, a Canadian who struggled with years of heroin addiction, lost her life after overdosing on drugs laced with fentanyl. Eight days later, her grieving brother also died of an opiate overdose. Their father, Alex Hamilton who also suffers from an opiate addiction, said he believes his son took his own life or was careless after losing his sister.

Today, deaths from drug overdose is twice that of motor vehicle accidents”

Less than 15 years ago, car accidents were responsible for more than twice as deaths than drug overdoses. Today, deaths from drug overdose is twice that of motor vehicle accidents. Opioid overdoses in particular have increased more that any other class of drugs, with heroin accounting for more than two-thirds of opiate-related fatalities. In 2015, over 33,000 opioid-related deaths compared to over 52,000 total drug overdose deaths.

Hidden Dangers of Illegal Opiates

In 2016, four teenagers overdosed in one rural West Virginian town during a weekend of celebration. Each one ingested drugs they thought was Ecstacy, or MDMA. While expecting the experience of euphoria and energy, the teens went into cardiac arrest and died due to fatal mixture of opiates and synthetic fentanyl. In May, 2016, law enforcement officers in Ohio seized over 500 counterfeit pills that were marked as 30 milligram oxycodone pharmaceuticals but actually turned out to be research chemical U-47700. The chemical, an experimental synthetic opioid, has never been tested in humans and has been responsible for several fatalities in the United States. Increased access to chinese-imported chemicals used in the production of street synthetic opioids is attributed in the huge increase in opiate overdoses. Also, the DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) attributes more distribution to rural and suburban areas as a large factor in increased opiate use and fatalities.

CDC officials have also directly attributed the dramatic increase of opioid overdose deaths to the increase of illicit fentanyl. Fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, is often mixed or cut with heroin to increase potency. In 2016, the DEA reported “hundreds of thousands of counterfeit pills have been entering the U.S. drug market since 2014, some containing deadly amounts of fentanyl and fentanyl analogs.”

Ending Addiction

Overcoming an opioid addiction is a mental and physical battle that can be won. Once the body becomes dependent on opioids, withholding the drug results in extremely uncomfortable and often unbearable withdrawal symptoms. For several days to a week, people may experience severe anxiety, intense cramps, fever, nausea, and diarrhea. Each individual’s degree of withdrawal depends on a lot of factors. Weight, physical health, psychological state, length of time in addiction and frequency of use are only a few of the major issues that affect difficulty with opiate and heroin withdrawal.

Recovery from addiction includes a post-acute withdrawal stage. During this phase, individuals may experience mood disturbed sleep, anger or anxiety. Symptoms may last anywhere from a few weeks to months depending on each case and personal health goals. Risk of suicide is highest during this healing phase as the body’s fluctuating neurochemical levels create extreme mood swings and depression. A strong support network and access to resources facilitates faster recovery and affects each individual’s opiate withdrawal timeline.

Seeking Recovery for the Addict and the Family

Withdrawal symptoms are rough, but they are not the only part of ending an addiction. It is important to surround yourself with support during this time as the psychological ramifications are as detrimental as the physical. The addict will likely need a strong support network that fully understands the process of withdrawal. Without this, relapse is a greater threat as recovery becomes an isolating experience.

The family of the addict must create a support network for recovery, as well. There will be moments during the recovery process that can seem so dark and so hopeless. During those time it is especially important to have access to resources and people that may be able to help pull them through. Addiction affects not only the addict but also everyone within the addict’s network. As such, recovery becomes a group effort with each individual requiring care throughout the process.

While some of the dangers of opiate addiction seem obvious, there are hidden dangers everyone should be aware of. The CDC plans to increase public awareness through education, provide more resources for treatment and early detection of overdose outbreaks. “It is important for the public to understand the present dangers of this epidemic that is claiming an increasing number of lives due to more potent street drugs, misinformation and other long-standing issues we must address within our government and communities.”

Sources:

https://www.dea.gov/divisions/hq/2016/hq072216.shtml
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/fentanyl-linked-deaths-regina-1.3868767

http://www.asam.org/docs/advocacy/societal-costs-of-prescription-opioid-abuse-dependence-and-misuse-in-the-united-states.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/epidemic/index.html

https://www.dea.gov/divisions/hq/2016/hq072216.shtml

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/how-bad-is-the-opioid-epidemic/

http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/news/20161004/risk-of-opioid-addiction-up-37-percent-among-young-us-adults

http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/counseling-and-addiction-how-therapy-can-help#1

About Today’s Guest Blogger: Bill Weiss      

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Bill is an advocate for long-term recovery, as well as being in recovery himself. He feels it is important to share addiction information with the public to educate them about substance abuse.

 

If you want to learn more:

unitingrecovery.com
455 NE 5th ave suite d478, Delray Beach, Florida

Guest blog posts are welcome additions to the content on this website. Guest blog posts represent the views, opinions and experiences of the author and do not necessarily represent Our Young Addicts. Together, we provide parents and professionals with a variety of perspectives and information.

©2017 Our Young Addicts   All Rights Reserved.