5 Ways You Can Support Your Kid in Their Recovery

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Recovery brings new opportunities and challenges for families. Guest blogger, Carl T. , shares five ideas to help support your loved one. MWM

The risk of relapsing after you have recovered from drug addiction, never leaves entirely, however, statistics suggest that it’s more likely to occur within the first few months of recovery. Addicts feel more vulnerable, they are going through many physical and psychological changes, and they feel anxious or stressful this, if not handled properly, could end in relapse.

 

In recovery, you learn to develop coping strategies effective enough to support your sobriety; unfortunately, they take some time to settle, and on the early stages of rehab as a recovering addict there is always the further stress of the lingering withdrawal symptoms. Nevertheless, don’t lose hope, recovery is a struggle but with time it will become easier and the addict’s resolve will strengthen.

To increase the chances of avoiding a relapse, it is always important to have support from your family and loved ones, it is never easy to love an addict, but you are one of the most important keys for them to recover from substance abuse. Here are some ways you can help your loved one during their early stages of recovery:

Learn to recognize the signs of relapse

Being able to recognize the signs of relapse can help you to learn proactive steps that should be taken to avoid the addict’s temptation to go back into their old habits of using. For each person, relapse can be far more dangerous than for others.

A single trigger can send someone back down the path of destruction and it’s important to educate yourself and learn about this topic. Learning how to recognize these warnings and reaching out for support is key to a path of a healthy recovery. Some common signs can include:

  • Easily annoyed or angered
  • Increased feelings of hopelessness or negativity
  • Loss of interest in family, friends and activities that they would usually love.
  • Deliberately putting themselves in risky situations
  • Increased stress levels

Signs can vary according to each person, but if you feel that something is not right your love one, sit down and talk with them, be patient and understanding. Figure out together what their triggers can be and enforce a plan to avoid situations that could cause them to plummet back to step one. The first few months are vital and very fragile to the result of their successful recovery.

Learn to have fun

Learning how to have fun without using will be a difficult step but an incredible valuable one; be persistent and dedicate time, tolerance and as many tries as necessary so you can help your loved one to figure this out. Start simple, go to see a comedy show with your loved one, or take up exercise.  Do they enjoy photography? Encourage them to go outside and take some pictures. Maybe spring-cleaning your house is more therapeutic for your loved one.

If you have the resources, take a trip somewhere relaxing like a natural park and go see some beautiful landscapes to help them get in touch with their spiritual side. While going on a trip is always exciting, remember that it’s important to take the person that’s going through recovery to places appropriate for a recovering addict. For example, going to a beach destination is not recommended due to its high triggers for relapse due to it’s laid back, drinking lifestyle.

Whatever their idea of fun may be, learn to discover new ways that they find relaxing and are positive for their recovery.

Learn to set and complete goals

Sitting down with your loved one to talk about their recovery, their short-term goals and their ambitions after recovery could be very beneficial for both you and for them. Creating short and long-term goals, and making plans to accomplish them fully, will bring the addict motivation and determination, key roles into the path of recovery.

Learn that goal setting is an ongoing process that will continue for the rest of their lives. Focusing clearly on the life that they want to live, free of substances is important. It will push them to work and make an effort to reach the life they want to live. As silly as the goal may seem, learn to take it seriously and give your continuous support.

Learn to be proud of milestones

Support your loved one by acknowledging the progress they have. In the 12-step sober programs, anniversaries and other milestones are a big deal. 24 hours, 30 days, 60 days and 90 days all deserve to be praised for and you can learn to do it from home as well.

A great idea to show your support in a positive way is to attend families support groups, they will guide through the path of encouraging to your loved one in a way that is constructive and makes them feel succeeded.

Learn to be patient

Recovery is a long, complicated process. It is natural for people to make mistakes during their recovery and it’s important for them to know that their family and friends still support them when they slip up. Remember that addiction is an illness and not a choice.

Educate yourself, read books and consult professionals so you can understand what your loved one is going through. If your loved one relapses, know that it’s not because they’re doing it to spite you or because they are ‘weak’, but because they have an illness that needs to be treated and overcome daily.

Whether your loved one is one day or three months into their recovery path, with a bit of patience, love, support and understanding you are helping to contribute to the new healthier version of the person you care about.

Are there any tips that you feel that we left out? Please leave a comment and share them with us below.

About Our Guest Blogger:

I’m Carl Towns, a 28-year-old wanna-be writer; I am also a recovering addict in the path of self-discovery. My goal is to learn as many things as possible and to seize every single moment I live, pretty much trying to make up for all that I missed on the years I was lost in drugs and alcohol (among other things). I’m in love with tech, cars and pretty much anything that can be found online.

Guest blog posts are welcome additions to the content on this website. Guest blog posts represent the views, opinions and experiences of the author and do not necessarily represent Our Young Addicts. Together, we provide parents and professionals with a variety of perspectives and information.

©2017 Our Young Addicts      All Rights Reserved

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